SSD or NO SSD.. That is the question

Sharky Forums


Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 33

Thread: SSD or NO SSD.. That is the question

  1. #1
    Hammerhead Shark
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,325

    SSD or NO SSD.. That is the question

    Ever since I had to get new hardware because of a meltdown on my computer, I have replaced many parts and now will most likely have to replace the CPU as its getting too old.

    I've been reading alot about SSD and want opinions from people who have them or have HAD them. Why would having a SSD for a DESKTOP be better? From what I've heard once SSD's are shot, you cant reformat to reinstall, you need a new HDD....

    MOBO: GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3
    CPU: i7-2700K
    RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws X 16GB (2 x 8GB)
    CPU COOLING:Corsair Hydro H80i
    VIDEO: MSI TF 2GD5/OC GeForce GTX 760 OC N760 in SLI
    HDD: Intel 320-160GB SSD
    HDD: Samsung 840 250GB SSD
    HDD: 1TB Seagate SATA
    HDD: 1TB WD SATA
    HDD: 2 TB Seagate SATA
    MEDIA: Plextor Dual DVD
    PSU: CORSAIR HX750W
    CASE: Antec Twelve Hundred V3 Full Tower
    OS: WIN 7 x64 Home Premium
    Monitor: Westinghouse 32" LCD 1080p

  2. #2
    Administrator Steve R Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5,380
    Once any hard drive is shot - its shot and has to be replaced...so nothing new there

    If you have money to burn and want faster boot up times - getting an SSD would be something to consider.
    "Imagine a world where dogs took bad owners to the pound."


    http://www.hopeforpaws.org/

  3. #3
    Hammerhead Shark
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,325
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve R Jones View Post
    Once any hard drive is shot - its shot and has to be replaced...so nothing new there

    If you have money to burn and want faster boot up times - getting an SSD would be something to consider.
    no I mean I was told that if the HDD gets corrupted and needs to be reformatted, that it's not possible. If this isnt the case, then what HDD would people recommend I get. My mobo is:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813130252

    I want to make sure that the one I get is compatible.

    Currently, I'm using 55GB for my C:/ and all I have on it are windows and program files.

    MOBO: GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3
    CPU: i7-2700K
    RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws X 16GB (2 x 8GB)
    CPU COOLING:Corsair Hydro H80i
    VIDEO: MSI TF 2GD5/OC GeForce GTX 760 OC N760 in SLI
    HDD: Intel 320-160GB SSD
    HDD: Samsung 840 250GB SSD
    HDD: 1TB Seagate SATA
    HDD: 1TB WD SATA
    HDD: 2 TB Seagate SATA
    MEDIA: Plextor Dual DVD
    PSU: CORSAIR HX750W
    CASE: Antec Twelve Hundred V3 Full Tower
    OS: WIN 7 x64 Home Premium
    Monitor: Westinghouse 32" LCD 1080p

  4. #4
    I don't roll on Shabbos! Timman_24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Urbana, IL
    Posts
    12,648
    Quote Originally Posted by kujoe2002 View Post

    Currently, I'm using 55GB for my C:/ and all I have on it are windows and program files.
    Damn winsxs. I've been trying to trim my Win 7 install, but haven't had much luck other than off loading my documents and programs to other drives. Win 7 seems like a space hog. I haven't found a "vlite" version yet either.
    PC: Corsair 550D
    4280k | Asus Rampage Gene | Mushkin 4x4GB | EVGA 780
    Intel 120GB SSD + 2TB Seagate | Seasonic 660 Plat
    2x Alphacool XT45 | Laing DDC | Bitspower

    Currently playing: Civ 5
    Last Game Beaten: Walking Dead

  5. #5
    Mako Shark kent1146's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    3,161
    Quote Originally Posted by kujoe2002 View Post
    Ever since I had to get new hardware because of a meltdown on my computer, I have replaced many parts and now will most likely have to replace the CPU as its getting too old.

    I've been reading alot about SSD and want opinions from people who have them or have HAD them. Why would having a SSD for a DESKTOP be better? From what I've heard once SSD's are shot, you cant reformat to reinstall, you need a new HDD....
    If you want an idea what you can do with an SSD, look at the video links in my signature.
    Laptop Madness (w/unboxing pics): | 17 Second Boot - POST to Desktop | SSD Boots Windows 7 + Load 27 Apps in 1 Minute | SSD vs HDD Direct Comparison - Identical Drive Images
    Alienware M11x R2 | Core i5 520UM | 4GB RAM | OCZ Vertex 2 120GB SSD | nVidia GeForce 335M GPU | 11.6" WLED Display | Etymotic ER-4P Headphones | 4.5lbs

  6. #6
    Hammerhead Shark Username's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Heuco Mundo
    Posts
    1,143
    Buy a decent, cheap WD hard drive and wait the extra few seconds.


    I'm just saying... unless you are doing something specific that warrants it, it usually just creates more problems than solves. Like loading into a zone in an online game like 5 seconds before anyone else... It's like "congrats", you just wasted $200.
    Last edited by Username; 05-29-2011 at 03:49 AM.
    AMD Phenom II X6 1055T @ 3.87 GHz
    ZOTAC GeForce GTX 560
    G.Skill Sniper 8GB DDR3-1333 PC3-10666
    (4096MB x2 CL9-9-9-24 1.5V)
    ASRock 870 Extreme 3
    Plextor M5S SSD
    Windows 7 x64 Compaq edition
    Viewsonic VX2233WM

  7. #7
    Mako Shark kent1146's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    3,161
    An ssd is not about faster load times of single applications. Any drive, SSD or mechanical HDD, can load single applications quickly.

    An SSD is about never having your computing experience slow down, because you are doing too many things at once. It is about never waiting for a thrashing hard drive to calm down before your computer becomes responsive again. It is about making your computing experience *smooth*, not making your computing experience *fast*.

    I never understand why people will drop several $100's on new CPU, motherboard, and RAM to get a better computing experience, and keep that new system shackled down to a $60 7200rpm mechanical HDD. If you want to upgrade your computer, your money will go much farther buying an SSD than any CPU upgrade you could ever buy.
    Laptop Madness (w/unboxing pics): | 17 Second Boot - POST to Desktop | SSD Boots Windows 7 + Load 27 Apps in 1 Minute | SSD vs HDD Direct Comparison - Identical Drive Images
    Alienware M11x R2 | Core i5 520UM | 4GB RAM | OCZ Vertex 2 120GB SSD | nVidia GeForce 335M GPU | 11.6" WLED Display | Etymotic ER-4P Headphones | 4.5lbs

  8. #8
    Master of the obvious Adisharr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    A room large enough for my head
    Posts
    6,543
    I don't use any computers that lack a SSD now. They make that much of a difference.
    ...WAIT FOR IT

  9. #9
    Great White Shark
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Alpharetta, Denial, Only certain songs.
    Posts
    9,784
    What he said. ^^

    Crusader for the 64-bit Era.
    New Rule: 2GB per core, minimum.

    Intel i7-2600K | Asus P8Z77-V | Samsung 840 Pro 256GB SSD
    16GB PC3-12800 Kingston DDR3 | PNY GTX 570
    Fractal Arc Midi |Seasonic X650 PSU | Klipsch ProMedia 5.1 Ultra | Windows 8.1 Pro x64

  10. #10
    Expensive Sushi
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    26
    The SSD speeds come at a price.
    1. SSDís are very expensive when comparing to HDís. At $300 for a 240Gbs SSD vs. $70 for 1Tb 7200RPM HD itís a no brainer. I Raid 0 my boot drive(s). Since data integrity is not relevant, I donít care if it craps out. All my stuff is on my internal backup drives.
    2. Limited storage space. Weíre at a point where you can get 2TBs and 3TBs HDís. The largest SSDís Iíve seen so far are 600GBs, unfortunately the cost is $1154 (not a typo). Thatís the cost a new decent laptop or SLI\Crossfire setup for your desktop rig.

    If this was a laptop I would say try the Seagate Momentus XT 500GB Solid State Hybrid (unless you wipe with 100 dollar bills then go for an SSD). You get decent storage plus fast boot speeds. But from all the articles I have read so far you wonít see much advantage on desktop computers when using one of those.

    I setup an OCZ 120GBs SSD on a friendís laptop and it cut the boot time by half (she has a semi decent HP, so I didnít expect much from it). On a desktop you will see even more of an improvement as long as you have a decent on-board controller and CPU (super cheap mobos need not apply, that would be like putting makeup on a pig)

    If you are willing to spend the money then go for an SSD. Otherwise just dump two 1TBs 7200ís into a RAID 0 and stick with it until the SSDís come down in price.

  11. #11
    Great White Shark
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    21,595
    I don't care about boot speeds because that is done infrequently and bringing a raid 5 array and a raid 1 array online takes a bit of time no matter how fast the OS is ready to go. What is important is accessing data as fast as possible once the system is running. That is where the SSD is important. I use the SSD for working files while most of my stuff resides on the raid arrays. I agree that 4 TB array of SSD's is cost prohibitive for most home users, but the SSD can play an important part of any home computing center.

  12. #12
    Mako Shark kent1146's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    3,161
    Quote Originally Posted by CrystalMeph View Post
    SSDís are very expensive when comparing to HDís. At $300 for a 240Gbs SSD vs. $70 for 1Tb 7200RPM HD itís a no brainer.
    Your whole argument is based around the fact that large bulk storage on SSD technology is expensive. Yes, it is.

    But think about it for a minute:

    (1) What do people use mass bulk storage for (1TB+ hard drives)? Most people use it to store bulk media... photos, videos, music, pr0n.

    (2) Does that bulk media (photos, videos, music, pr0n) benefit from SSD speeds? No.

    (3) What DOES benefit from SSD speeds? OS, applications, game load times.

    (4) Is 120GB enough to store OS, applications, and games? For most people, yes.


    That is exactly why SSD owners always have a secondary bulk storage mechanical drive, to store their bulk media. They keep the space-eating content like music, photos, videos, etc off of the SSDs, because it is a waste of very valuable and expensive SSD storage space.

    Yes, using an SSD is far less convenient than just buying one gigantic 7200rpm 2TB mechanical HDD, partitioning it as one giant C:\ drive, and calling it a day. But it is very manageable. And hundreds of thousands of hardcore computer enthusiasts who absolutely demand the best performance are willing to go through the inconvenience, because it gives them performance you cannot get anywhere else.

    Check out some of the videos in my signature, if you want to know more about what SSDs can do.
    Laptop Madness (w/unboxing pics): | 17 Second Boot - POST to Desktop | SSD Boots Windows 7 + Load 27 Apps in 1 Minute | SSD vs HDD Direct Comparison - Identical Drive Images
    Alienware M11x R2 | Core i5 520UM | 4GB RAM | OCZ Vertex 2 120GB SSD | nVidia GeForce 335M GPU | 11.6" WLED Display | Etymotic ER-4P Headphones | 4.5lbs

  13. #13
    Great White Shark
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    21,595
    One thing people do not do very often is mount a volume in an empty folder on the root volume.
    I have many volumes, but they are all accessed via C:\<something>.

  14. #14
    Expensive Sushi
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    26
    I understand your arguments and I do agree to a certain degree.
    Here is my BUT...:
    I can fill a 120GBs boot drive with apps in about 1 evening.
    My primary Raid 0 array is currently 2TBs. It is 1.4TBs full. Thatís my games, apps and anything Iím currently working on (surprisingly games eat up free space quickly...bloody Steam sales...). My backup storage drives: 3x 2Tbs WD Greens (non raided). Since they are storage\backup and media playback only they donít need to be fast (FYI, I am aware of the head ďissueĒ on the WD Green drives).
    For someone like me, or any other pack rat (and I personally know a few), a 120Gbs SSD would be painful to use due to the number of installed apps and games.
    So it really comes down to this: if you have only a few apps and games that you use and can afford one then get an SSD (just do some research before you go out and buy the cheapest one you find). If you are a hoarder and need a lot of space for you boot drive and want to do it on the cheap then setup a HD Raid array.

  15. #15
    Great White Shark
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    21,595
    120 GB of apps is a very large amount. I suspect that you've also loaded the data files for those apps on the drive, the paging file, etc. The paging file should NOT be on the same volume as the OS. I have over 500 apps loaded on my notebook. The Program File folder takes less than 10 GB and the Program Files (x86) folder takes less than 5 GB.

    IMO your issue is really with the location (organization) of files, not the total size.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •