How should I partition this drive.

Sharky Forums


Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: How should I partition this drive.

  1. #1
    Mako Shark
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,266

    How should I partition this drive.

    I dug up an old 320 gig drive and I want to partition it so I can install Windows 7 and Linux. The only reason for Windows 7 will be DX11. I have three 1TB NTFS drives in the system so storage will not be an issue on the boot drive.

  2. #2
    MakoSharkero bldegle2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Floyd, VA, usa
    Posts
    3,044
    90/70/160, assuming Linux has a smaller install footprint..

    win7/Lin/pagefile and more storage...

    or,

    divide/2, LOL

    or,

    the OS that gets the most clutter gets the larger partition...

    I need some coffee..

    laterzzzz...
    Last edited by bldegle2; 03-25-2012 at 10:41 AM.
    I am gettin too old for all this st.ff!

    Specs? it runs.................

    Tbird quotes:

    "I dont care that much for gaming"
    "I am done with 3dmark."

    AsRock 970 Extreme4,Vishera 8320 @4.6, Vertex 4 256GB SataIII SSD, 2xVelociraptor 600GB 10,000 spinner in raid 0 storage....16g Gskill DDR3 2133 @2292, ATI 6850, back on huge air (quiet)....HP Laptop redone OS (ie, no HP krud), AMD Phenom II N620, 8gig DDR3 1333 ram, Sanddisk SataII 120GB SSD, Toshiba 500GB 7200 spinner...

  3. #3
    Great White Shark
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Alpharetta, Denial, Only certain songs.
    Posts
    9,771
    If not planning on storing anything on the OS drive, simply do 50/50. If you have the desire, you can also use ext3 vs. ext4. That way, both systems could see both partitions. (Using an ext2 driver for windows,for example.)

    Crusader for the 64-bit Era.
    New Rule: 2GB per core, minimum.

    Intel i7-2600K | Asus P8Z77-V | Samsung 840 Pro 256GB SSD
    16GB PC3-12800 Kingston DDR3 | PNY GTX 570
    Fractal Arc Midi |Seasonic X650 PSU | Klipsch ProMedia 5.1 Ultra | Windows 8.1 Pro x64

  4. #4
    Mako Shark
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,266
    I don't need Windows to see the Linux partition just Linux to see windows. That does not seem to be an issue with my current install of Ubuntu.

  5. #5
    Sushi
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2

    Ans: How should I partition this drive. Reply to Thread

    Hi drdoom,

    Before you partition and format your hard disk, make sure that you do the following:

    If you are using a SATA hard disk, skip this step and go to the "Determine the type of file system that you want to use" section. If you are using an IDE hard disk, set the jumpers and the cabling according to the role of the hard disk (for example, master or subordinate) and make any required BIOS (or CMOS) changes. To set the jumpers and cabling, and make any required BIOS or CMOS changes, see the documentation that was included with your hard disk and motherboard, or contact the manufacturers.

    You can use either the NTFS or FAT file systems.
    If the hard disk already contains data, back it up
    If the hard disk has a drive overlay or a disk management program, make sure that it is compatible
    If you have software that you want to reinstall, verify that you have the disks
    You can use the Windows XP Setup program to partition and format the hard disk.

    Thanks | see if this helps

  6. #6
    Sushi
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2
    Hi drdoom,

    You can use your operating system disk to make partition. Before you partition and format your hard disk, make sure that you do the following: Prepare the hard disk according to the manufacturer's instructions Determine the type of file system that you want to use.
    If the hard disk already contains data, back it up. If the hard disk has a drive overlay or a disk management program, make sure that it is compatible

    Thanks | see if this helps

  7. #7
    Mako Shark
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,266
    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    If not planning on storing anything on the OS drive, simply do 50/50. If you have the desire, you can also use ext3 vs. ext4. That way, both systems could see both partitions. (Using an ext2 driver for windows,for example.)
    I'm using some freeware partition software and it give the option of NTFS, ext3 and ext4 as the file system. Which would give both Linux access to Windows but not the other way around and which gives both OS's access?

  8. #8
    Invisible Modfish Vindir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,649
    You're stuck with NTFS for the windows install so linux will have access.

    For the linux side:
    • An ext2 or ext3 system for the linux install will let you set up windows to read/write through a few third-party drivers of varying quality.
    • If you want to give windows read-only access to linux an ext4 partition is supported for reads with the same drivers as above for now.
    • If you want to cut windows off from the linux install go with btrfs or xfs or resierfs or the like.
    Last edited by Vindir; 03-31-2012 at 08:03 PM.
    Insert ancient Sharky sig here
    [
    Prince Vindir of the OC Crusaders
    Holding Boundaries and Breaking Barriers

    ]

  9. #9
    Great White Shark
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Alpharetta, Denial, Only certain songs.
    Posts
    9,771
    Quote Originally Posted by Vindir View Post
    [*]If you want to give windows read-only access to linux an ext4 partition is supported for reads with the same drivers as above for now.
    They have Windows drivers for ext4 now? I thought native extents broke compatibility with the ext2/3 drivers that were available.

    Crusader for the 64-bit Era.
    New Rule: 2GB per core, minimum.

    Intel i7-2600K | Asus P8Z77-V | Samsung 840 Pro 256GB SSD
    16GB PC3-12800 Kingston DDR3 | PNY GTX 570
    Fractal Arc Midi |Seasonic X650 PSU | Klipsch ProMedia 5.1 Ultra | Windows 8.1 Pro x64

  10. #10
    Invisible Modfish Vindir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,649
    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    They have Windows drivers for ext4 now? I thought native extents broke compatibility with the ext2/3 drivers that were available.
    Yeah, ext2read supports both ext4 and lvm2 for read-only mounts now. It was added in almost 2 years ago now, it just didn't get much fanfare.
    Insert ancient Sharky sig here
    [
    Prince Vindir of the OC Crusaders
    Holding Boundaries and Breaking Barriers

    ]

  11. #11
    Hammerhead Shark
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,323
    I have ubuntu on a 500GB SATA HDD (disk 2) partitioned to hold win 8 and mint as well. They all (but mint show up fine on the boot. I setup a 50GB partition for ubuntu as NTFS. It runs fine. It only took 3.2GB of the 50GB I partitioned. If the HDD is 320, this is what I would do:

    part (x): 80GB NTFS Ubuntu
    Part (x): 200GB NTFS Win 7
    rest setup as data sector or free space. You can change the 80 to 120 (true 120GB) incase you think you are going to install many programs on ubuntu. If you are going to run a lot of programs on ubuntu, then I would run two partitions both at NTFS split equally (roughly 160 GB each)
    Last edited by kujoe2002; 04-04-2012 at 07:58 PM.

    MOBO: GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3
    CPU: i7-2700K
    RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws X 16GB (2 x 8GB)
    CPU COOLING:Corsair Hydro H80i
    VIDEO: MSI TF 2GD5/OC GeForce GTX 760 OC N760 in SLI
    HDD: Intel 320-160GB SSD
    HDD: Samsung 840 250GB SSD
    HDD: 1TB Seagate SATA
    HDD: 1TB WD SATA
    HDD: 2 TB Seagate SATA
    MEDIA: Plextor Dual DVD
    PSU: CORSAIR HX750W
    CASE: Antec Twelve Hundred V3 Full Tower
    OS: WIN 7 x64 Home Premium
    Monitor: Westinghouse 32" LCD 1080p

  12. #12
    Great White Shark
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Alpharetta, Denial, Only certain songs.
    Posts
    9,771
    Personally, I wouldn't plan on running any Linux in the long term off of an NTFS r/w partition as the boot/root partition. Maybe that's FUD talking, but I've seen way too many linux systems eat NTFS partitions after they have been heavily used.

    Crusader for the 64-bit Era.
    New Rule: 2GB per core, minimum.

    Intel i7-2600K | Asus P8Z77-V | Samsung 840 Pro 256GB SSD
    16GB PC3-12800 Kingston DDR3 | PNY GTX 570
    Fractal Arc Midi |Seasonic X650 PSU | Klipsch ProMedia 5.1 Ultra | Windows 8.1 Pro x64

  13. #13
    Invisible Modfish Vindir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,649
    Installing linux to an NTFS partition sounds like a bad idea all around. Quick googling didn't come up with much, but I assume if it's working for Ubuntu they're doing a wubi style install and you're basically wrapping up a virtual disk on top of the ntfs partition. NTFS doesn't store the proper metadata to handle linux permissions and file access entries.

    edit: Assuming it is a wubi install awful performance is the most obvious reason to not do it that way - http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ubi_1010&num=4
    Last edited by Vindir; 04-04-2012 at 11:15 PM.
    Insert ancient Sharky sig here
    [
    Prince Vindir of the OC Crusaders
    Holding Boundaries and Breaking Barriers

    ]

  14. #14
    Mako Shark
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,266
    Quote Originally Posted by kujoe2002 View Post
    I have ubuntu on a 500GB SATA HDD (disk 2) partitioned to hold win 8 and mint as well. They all (but mint show up fine on the boot. I setup a 50GB partition for ubuntu as NTFS. It runs fine. It only took 3.2GB of the 50GB I partitioned. If the HDD is 320, this is what I would do:

    part (x): 80GB NTFS Ubuntu
    Part (x): 200GB NTFS Win 7
    rest setup as data sector or free space. You can change the 80 to 120 (true 120GB) incase you think you are going to install many programs on ubuntu. If you are going to run a lot of programs on ubuntu, then I would run two partitions both at NTFS split equally (roughly 160 GB each)
    I want to give Linux as much dedicated space as possible since Win7 will be a secondary OS. Storage space for Win7 will not be a problem since the computer has 3 other NTFS 1Tb drives. One of them has a 75gig WinXP OS partition. All other space is for storage. Would 100Gb be sufficient for Win7?

  15. #15
    Hammerhead Shark
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,323
    Quote Originally Posted by Vindir View Post
    Installing linux to an NTFS partition sounds like a bad idea all around. Quick googling didn't come up with much, but I assume if it's working for Ubuntu they're doing a wubi style install and you're basically wrapping up a virtual disk on top of the ntfs partition. NTFS doesn't store the proper metadata to handle linux permissions and file access entries.

    edit: Assuming it is a wubi install awful performance is the most obvious reason to not do it that way - http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ubi_1010&num=4
    I'm not running mine WUBI style and it's functioning fine for me.

    MOBO: GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3
    CPU: i7-2700K
    RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws X 16GB (2 x 8GB)
    CPU COOLING:Corsair Hydro H80i
    VIDEO: MSI TF 2GD5/OC GeForce GTX 760 OC N760 in SLI
    HDD: Intel 320-160GB SSD
    HDD: Samsung 840 250GB SSD
    HDD: 1TB Seagate SATA
    HDD: 1TB WD SATA
    HDD: 2 TB Seagate SATA
    MEDIA: Plextor Dual DVD
    PSU: CORSAIR HX750W
    CASE: Antec Twelve Hundred V3 Full Tower
    OS: WIN 7 x64 Home Premium
    Monitor: Westinghouse 32" LCD 1080p

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •