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Thread: How to access Ubuntu VM

  1. #1
    Hammerhead Shark Geforce255's Avatar
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    How to access Ubuntu VM

    Seems like a silly question.

    I set up a VM under EAX 4.0; put Ubuntu 11.10 on it. Everything cool so far. But my normal method of accessing a VM is to RDP into it. Except Ubuntu doesn't have RDP. I put VNC on it, but it's a lousy way to do it because the the screen is locked to the 640 X 480 resolution of the EAX console.

    There has to be a better way. Anyone know of an RDP equivalent for Linux?
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  2. #2
    LOLWUT ImaNihilist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geforce255 View Post
    Seems like a silly question.

    I set up a VM under EAX 4.0; put Ubuntu 11.10 on it. Everything cool so far. But my normal method of accessing a VM is to RDP into it. Except Ubuntu doesn't have RDP. I put VNC on it, but it's a lousy way to do it because the the screen is locked to the 640 X 480 resolution of the EAX console.

    There has to be a better way. Anyone know of an RDP equivalent for Linux?
    VNC is the RDP equivalent. Resizing and other features are handled the VNC server on the host machine.

  3. #3
    Hammerhead Shark Geforce255's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ImaNihilist View Post
    VNC is the RDP equivalent. Resizing and other features are handled the VNC server on the host machine.
    I was afraid that would be the answer. I'll download a different VNC and see if I get better results.

    Thanks for the response.
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    LOLWUT ImaNihilist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geforce255 View Post
    I was afraid that would be the answer. I'll download a different VNC and see if I get better results.

    Thanks for the response.
    There are different VNC servers. Check out x11vnc.

  5. #5
    Tiger Shark linoleum's Avatar
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    Use nxserver:
    http://www.nomachine.com/download-pa...p?Prod_Id=3591

    And if you're using Windows for the client:
    http://www.nomachine.com/download-pa...p?Prod_Id=3655

    In my experience, it's quite fast and it can handle different resolutions.

    I think there are open source versions too (freenx?) but since the nomachine one is free and packaged well, that's what I've always used.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NX_technology
    Last edited by linoleum; 04-27-2012 at 08:28 AM.

  6. #6
    Hammerhead Shark Geforce255's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ImaNihilist View Post
    There are different VNC servers. Check out x11vnc.
    Thanks, that's exactly the one I ended up with. It is better. VNC is still vastly inferior to RDP though. Linux needs a way to spawn an actual session remotely, not just remote control the host.

    I had been using VNC4Server initially.
    Last edited by Geforce255; 04-27-2012 at 08:51 AM.
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  7. #7
    Hammerhead Shark Geforce255's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by linoleum View Post
    Use nxserver:
    http://www.nomachine.com/download-pa...p?Prod_Id=3591

    And if you're using Windows for the client:
    http://www.nomachine.com/download-pa...p?Prod_Id=3655

    In my experience, it's quite fast and it can handle different resolutions.

    I think there are open source versions too (freenx?) but since the nomachine one is free and packaged well, that's what I've always used.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NX_technology
    Thanks,

    I'm giving these a try.
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  8. #8
    Great White Shark rimmerchant's Avatar
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    funny as I was setting up virtual machines for LInux and OSX for the first time this past week and playing with Unix/OSX.

    I have TeamViewer installed on all those VM and I can access it fine. no need to fudge with opening ports or anything.
    really easy to setup. free for personal use and next to no nagging screens or ads
    Last edited by rimmerchant; 05-03-2012 at 10:13 PM.
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  9. #9
    Hammerhead Shark
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geforce255 View Post
    Thanks, that's exactly the one I ended up with. It is better. VNC is still vastly inferior to RDP though. Linux needs a way to spawn an actual session remotely, not just remote control the host.

    I had been using VNC4Server initially.
    I wouldn't say it's inferior. It just works differently than what you are expecting.

    The problem is Linux (*nix in general) evolved differently and there were GUI remote access solutions before RDP existed. If you were running a *nix box as your client machine, you could SSH to another *nix host. Once SSH'd, you could use X11 forwarding (might not be the correct term) and open GUI applications that would run in your local window manager. You can even run an X11 server on Windows and do the same thing from a Windows client.

    Also, depending on how you configure the different VNC packages, it does actually spawn a remote session and not just provide control and view of the console. This used to be standard behavior, but I haven't played for it for quite some time. When I was doing it years ago, I wanted console interaction that a user sitting in front of the monitor could watch, and I had to do extra work to make it work that way.

    The other reason you don't see an RDP clone is there isn't demand. People running big *nix servers aren't administering them with the GUI. If there is a GUI involved, it's web based. Most administration is going to happen through an SSH connection and shell commands.
    Nick_B
    Currently running Ubuntu and Windows 7.

  10. #10
    Hammerhead Shark Geforce255's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply Nick.

    I'm still just playing with the various Nix distros. I don't have a lot of interest in learning scripting, which really seems like a major step backwards in how we manage servers.
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  11. #11
    LOLWUT ImaNihilist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geforce255 View Post
    Thanks for the reply Nick.

    I'm still just playing with the various Nix distros. I don't have a lot of interest in learning scripting, which really seems like a major step backwards in how we manage servers.
    What kind of server are you trying to manage through a UI?

  12. #12
    Hammerhead Shark
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geforce255 View Post
    Thanks for the reply Nick.

    I'm still just playing with the various Nix distros. I don't have a lot of interest in learning scripting, which really seems like a major step backwards in how we manage servers.
    GUI vs. console is somewhat subjective, but even Microsoft is realizing that the console might be the better option for server management. There are multiple Exchange 2010 features inaccessible to the GUI that are simple in the Exchange Management Shell. Similarly for SharePoint. Most new MS server products are going to include functionality implemented at the PowerShell level and then some features will later be exposed to a GUI (which itself actually runs PowerShell scripts).

    I took over management of our Exchange environment during the migration from 2003 to 2010. Honestly, PowerShell + Exchange Management Shell brings Exchange from being a clunky pain to almost a pleasure to manage.

    EDIT: Also, cpanel is frequently used to provide a web interface for managing a variety of server functions on Linux. It's pretty pricey. I've never used it, but I'm guessing there might be a reason for it's popularity.
    Last edited by Nick_B; 05-09-2012 at 03:21 PM. Reason: cpanel info
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  13. #13
    Hammerhead Shark Geforce255's Avatar
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    Hi Nick;

    Powershell is much of the reason that I'm turned off to scripting. I really don't see it as a step forward in Exchange management. I'm running a 2010 with UC, which means my phones and video are running through Exchange as well as email. I could always write scripts for repetitive tasks, so I'm really not sure what taking functions out of the GUI was supposed to buy us?

    I don't hate Powershell, it just reminds me of going back to Novel or DOS. I honestly think command line structures are used from an elitist point of view, that they don't really improve productivity, they just cut the competition and ensure job security for those who know the scripting languages.

    I dumped Cisco precisely because of that game. When I want to accomplish a task in my firewall, I want to accomplish it, I have no desire to become a CCNE, I have a company to run. Palo Alto enables that, Cisco retarded the ability to get the task done.

    Microsoft understood this for years. Yes, I'm an MCSE (2003) but even in areas that I'm not familiar, I can drill through the UI and figure out what to do to make my task work.

    In all fairness, the internet has changed this all. I don't know much Linux, yet can pretty well do anything I set out to do by a quick Google search and a series of SUDO commands.

    My servers will stay Windows for at least 5 more years. For one thing, MSSQL is a Microsoft product, and that is the lifeblood to my system. Exchange is right up there, as is Kantech, which controls - well, everything.
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  14. #14
    Hammerhead Shark
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    I think it is still important for MS (and that they know this) to have most features readily available in the GUI, and I think they know this. They just realized that having a good command-line first was more important. Every SP for Exchange 2010 has included more tools available in the EMC or ECP, but cutting-edge features are frequently relegated to EMS until a GUI is built around them.

    This line of thinking is probably a boon to big environments and a frustration to smaller environments. Where the power shines is in making sweeping changes. If I want to change some tiny mailbox parameter on 500 mailboxes, I don't want to do so by opening each one up. In Powershell, I can do something like "get-mailbox | set-mailbox -whatever" and be done with it.

    When I'm looking at vendors (and I suspect most large and advanced IT shops do similar), it is important to me that there is a solid, command-driven, scriptable interface. A good GUI on top of it is also a good feature, but less important to me.

    On our Cisco routers http is either unavailable or turned off by configuration, on our Juniper Level 3 switches I leave http enabled but use the CLI 95% of the time, on our NetApp storage I do simple tasks through the GUI but go to the command line frequently (especially for any task that needs done to more than two or three volumes).

    As an aside, we have a Palo Alto Firewall and I really don't care for the GUI. I haven't had time to learn the CLI, but I imagine I'll be using it if I ever become particularly involved with the Firewall end.
    Nick_B
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